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Trump as President and the use of force

Trump as President and the use of force
14th August 2017 Cities and Memory

With President Trump very much in the global spotlight for all the wrong reasons once again, it feels like a good time to highlight another one of our Trump protests – and one in which the threat of violence looms loud and clear.

Tim Kahn recorded this on November 10, 2016 after Donald Trump was elected president, and writes:

“This was the second night of protests in Portland Oregon. The first night was very different and the police didn’t intervene.

“However on this night, the Portland police, who are notorious for being militant and aggressive showed why they have that reputation.

“The recording beings at the corner of SW 6th and Yamhill st. Portland, OR (you can hear this in the police announcement at the start of the recording).”

City version:

Richard Watts has taken this recording and created a study of the use of force on protesters:

“This piece is based on a slowed down extract of the original recording which sounds a bit like cattle groaning. I thought this was quite interesting as crowds of people tend to act like cattle when confronted with danger.

“The echoey piano is supposed to reflect busyness of the protest with lots of different chants and shouts.”

Memory version:

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